Wildwood

Once we’d made the decision to move to Portland I set about doing some research. I flicked through some city guides and cycling guides, but the bulk of my research into our new home consisted of reading the Wildwood Chronicles – a children’s fantasy series which is set in Portland.

Wildwood-series

The Wildwood Chronicles are written and illustrated by a husband and wife team who live in Portland. Colin Meloy is the lead vocalist of Portland indie folk band The Decemberists and his wife, Carson Ellis, is an award winning children’s book illustrator. It’s got elements of fairy tale, Narnia, Alice in Wonderland, Tolkien and Jim Henson’s Labyrinth; talking animals; evil industrialist tycoons and, to me anyway, a very strong plug for the power and benefits of meditation. Truth be told the reviews of this series are very mixed – it seems to be a love it or hate it kind of book. I’d seen it back in the library at John Kerr elementary  – what attracted me to it is the illustrations – but I doubt I would have made time for it had it not been set in Portland. Having said that, I did enjoy all three of the chronicles. Possibly much of that was to do with the fact that I was reading about an environment that was soon to be my home. I read the books whilst still in Bend…they got me quite excited about the move!

In one of those lovely twists of fate, we have ended up living not far from Forest Park, the Wildwood which is the key setting of the stories. The Wildwood area is also home to Pittock Mansion, an historic home that was built in 1914 for one of Portland’s founding families. Pittock Mansion features in the Wildwood Chronicles – it is the seat of Government for South Wood. (In the Wildwood Chronicles, Forest Park is divided into North Wood which is pastoral and rural, whereas the South is industrialized and urban.)

Today we took a wee stroll through some of the Wildwood trails and had a quick look at the exterior of Pittock Mansion.

Heading into Wildwood...
Heading into Wildwood.
We are loving the abundance of trees in our neck of the woods!
We are loving the abundance of trees in our neck of the woods!
Pittock Mansion. We plan to return closer to Christmas...apparently the decorations are quite spectacular.
Pittock Mansion. We plan to return closer to Christmas…apparently the decorations are quite spectacular.
Carson Ellis' rendition of Pittock Mansion juxtaposed with the real thing.
Carson Ellis’ rendition of Pittock Mansion juxtaposed with the real thing.

We are loving all the trees in Portland. We’ve nicknamed our house the tree house as that’s pretty much all you see from any of our windows, and luckily, we have a lot of them!

Our backyard...only one word for it...trees!
Our backyard…only one word for it…trees!

Much of our time since arriving in Portland has been focussed on the new house and the new school, but we did find some time last weekend to get away to the coast. One of the attractions of Portland – apart from all the trees – is it’s proximity to the sea, something us island dwellers sorely missed whilst in VA where it was a good three hour drive to get to the closest beach.

Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach. Had such a great day there we have booked to go back for a weekend in October.
Haystack Rock at Cannon Beach. Had such a great day there we have booked to go back for a weekend in October.
Only these two would be crazy enough to get into the water!
Only these two would be crazy enough to get into the water!
There is always time for handstand practice.
There is always time for handstand practice.
The sea! Such a beautiful sight.
The sea! Such a beautiful sight.
And I even managed to get in a photo for once!
And I even managed to get in a photo for  once!

So twenty four days after arriving in Portland we are doing well. The girls and I even survived a whole week by ourselves when Richard was taking in the delights of Cincinnati and Boston last week.

I hope to be back soon with more about our new home. We hope that all our friends and family are well and happy and that you enjoy the beginnings of our Portlandia adventure!

Take me out to the ballgame…

The game of baseball is believed to have originated in England. Both baseball and rounders were played in England and are thought to be regional variations of the same thing – the name, I guess, depending on which part of England you were playing in. Whether you referred to it as rounders or baseball, the game is thought to have derived from a fifteenth century English sport known as “Stoolball”. This somewhat scatological term is nothing to do with number twos (!) – it’s actually a reference to the milking stools that were used as wickets, because stoolball was traditionally played by milkmaids. (By this point in my research I was laughing out loud. Stools, milkmaids…I think I would pay good money to see that!!)

Unfortunately this was the best image of stoolball I could find - apologies for the lack of buxom milkmaids.
Unfortunately this was the best image of stoolball I could find – apologies for the lack of buxom milkmaids.

The early form of baseball was brought to North America by English immigrants, where it is first officially referred to in a 1791 bylaw from a town in Massachusetts – the game was not allowed to be played near the town’s new meeting house. By the early 1830s, games of baseball were popping up all over North America, but it wasn’t until 1846 that the first officially recorded baseball game was played in the United States. On June 19th in Hoboken, New Jersey, the New York Nine defeated the New York Knickerbockers 23 runs to 1. The Knickerbockers were responsible for putting some structure around the game – establishing rules around the number of innings, types of pitches allowed and type of ball that could be used.

New York Knickerbockers
New York Knickerbockers

In the mid 1850s, New York went baseball crazy and the game started to be referred to as the “national pastime” or “national game”. Leagues and associations were formed and admission was charged at the big games. Today, I’m told, it’s NFL or American Football which holds the title of national sport or game, but baseball is still very popular, based on the crowds we witnessed at Nationals Park last Sunday.

Our neighbours invited us to watch the Washington Nationals play the Texas Rangers. This was a pretty big deal as our neighbour is from Texas and it’s not often that the Nationals meet the Rangers on the field. This is due to one of the many confusing aspects of baseball. In the US there are two leagues – the National League and the American League and each of these leagues is split into East, West and Central divisions. Because the Nationals are in the National League and the Rangers are in the American League, it’s rare that they face off against each other, so it was a particularly good game to see. Plus they didn’t just play one game – they played Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Another confusing aspect is just how many games there are…I won’t go into that because I’ve probably lost many of you!! I’ll just get back to the game we watched!

Nationals Park...home of the Washington Nationals...who up until five years ago used to be the Montreal Expos and were based in Canada...I promise that's the last confusing thing!!
Nationals Park…home of the Washington Nationals…who up until five years ago used to be the Montreal Expos and were based in Canada…yet more confusing things!!
We made sure we donned appropriate Nationals attire.
We made sure we donned appropriate Nationals attire.
Baseball sculpture thing inside the stadium.
Baseball sculpture thing inside the stadium.
First pitch of the game.
First pitch of the game.
"Mmmm...not a patch on an All Blacks test!"
“Mmmm…not a patch on an All Blacks test!”
The Ranger's secret weapon is their Japanese pitcher. Baseball is one of the most popular sports in Japan - the first team was established in 1878.
The Ranger’s secret weapon is their Japanese pitcher. Baseball is one of the most popular sports in Japan – the first team was established in 1878.
Keeping the crowd entertained is an important part of a baseball game. This is called the President's race!
Keeping the crowd entertained is an important part of a baseball game. This is called the President’s race!
Thomas Jefferson was the winner and he strolled around showing off his winner's belt.
Thomas Jefferson was the winner and he strolled around showing off his winner’s belt.
Edie indulging in some ice cream dippin' dots. Other important baseball snacks are peanuts and Crackerjack - kind of like caramel popcorn.
Edie indulging in some ice cream dippin’ dots. Other important baseball snacks are peanuts and Crackerjack – kind of like caramel popcorn.
The Nationals mascot wasn't too happy. After nearly three hours, the Rangers were victorious - two home runs to nil.
The Nationals mascot wasn’t too happy. After nearly three hours, the Rangers were victorious – two home runs to nil.

I have to say that my personal highlight came halfway during the seventh innings. This is when what is referred to as “the seventh innings stretch” takes place. Everyone stands, stretches and then sings Take Me Out To The Ballgame…felt like I was in a movie!! We sounded nothing like this…

So all in all it was a very fun afternoon. I don’t think we’ll be rushing out to buy season tickets but I’m sure if the opportunity presents itself we’ll be happy to venture out again to the old ballgame!

Special thanks to Tim, Corene, Madison and Chase for being such wonderful hosts and for patiently answering all my dumb questions 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

Gettysburg

The most famous and arguably most important battle of the American Civil War, took place over three hot summer days in July 1863 around the small market town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. What began as a skirmish between General Robert E. Lee’s Confederate Army of Northern Virginia (the South) and the Union Army of the Potomac (the North), evolved into a three day battle involving around 160,000 Americans. It also produced one of the best known speeches in American history – The Gettysburg Address – given by President Abraham Lincoln at the dedication of the Soldier’s National Cemetery in Gettysburg, four and a half months after the guns were silenced.

(Along with the battle of Waterloo, Gettysburg is one of the most documented battles in history and I’m not going to attempt to add to that!! You can click here to read more about the battle and the key players involved.)

picFrame (14)

After our immersion in the fun and frivolous world of chocolate, it was somewhat sobering to travel a mere forty miles and be immersed in the world of battle and bloodshed. Despite not being American or having any sort of link to the Civil War, both Richard and I found it to be a very moving and haunting place, and once again we were kicking ourselves that we never got to Ypres in Belgium, where so many Kiwi soldiers lost their lives during the first world war.

At the Gettysburg museum we watched a short film narrated by Morgan Freeman – yours truly in tears before it was even half way through – and then experienced the Gettysburg Cyclorama. Cycloramas are panoramic scenes painted onto the inside of a cylindrical platform. They are designed to make the viewer feel as if they are in the middle of a famous place or scene and the first cyclorama was opened in Edinburgh in 1787. The Gettysburg Cyclorama was painted by a French artist, Paul Phillipoteaux, and depicts Pickett’s Charge which was the climax of the battle of Gettysburg.

Philippoteaux at work on the Gettysburg cyclorama.
Philippoteaux at work on the Gettysburg cyclorama.
Scenes form the cyclorama.
Scenes from the cyclorama.

We were all keen to explore the battlefields but they are spread out over a huge area. So we hired a guide who drove us around for two hours and brought to life key moments and people involved in the battle. With a degree in Civil War History he was the perfect teacher and kept us all engrossed as we visited key sites – Little Round Top, the Wheatfield, Devil’s Den, the Peach Orchard, Culp’s Hill and Cemetery Hill.

Out and about with Kyle our wonderful guide. Even Olive had questions for him!
Out and about with Kyle our wonderful guide. Even Olive had questions for him!
Exploring Cemetery Hill and the National Soldier's Cemetery.
Exploring Cemetery Hill and the National Soldier’s Cemetery.
So many interesting things to experience in Gettysburg.
So many interesting things to experience in Gettysburg.

President Abraham Lincoln traveled to Gettysburg in November 1863 for the dedication of the new soldier’s cemetery. There were numerous speeches given on that day, the 19th of November, but it was Lincoln’s that became synonymous with the great battle. At around 270 words it was on the short side for a Lincoln speech but is now widely regarded as one of the greatest speeches ever made.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln
November 19, 1863

Abe shows up in many places around Gettysburg.
Abe shows up in many places around Gettysburg.

We thoroughly enjoyed our stop in Gettysburg and plan to go back in July when my parents come to visit and we’ll be making sure to book Kyle again so we can learn even more about this very important place.

I’m writing this after eating a delicious Mother’s Day lunch cooked for me by my wonderful husband. Wishing all those mothers out there a wonderful day…very excited and happy at the prospect of seeing my Mother in a couple of months 🙂

Take care everyone xxx

 

 

The Handley March

John Handley was born in County Wexford in Ireland in 1835. He emigrated with his family to the United States, becoming a citizen in 1850. Handley worked as a carpenter, before studying law and working in Washington DC for President James Buchanan. He settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania where he practiced law, eventually becoming a judge.

Judge John Handley
Judge John Handley

Handley showed great concern for those less fortunate than himself and was known for his charitable actions and the many donations he made, which helped students in many schools and universities complete their educations. During the Civil War, Handley sympathised with the South and was a great admirer of Stonewall Jackson, one of the best known confederate commanders. Jackson was based in Winchester for several months during the course of the war and I’m assuming this is the reason why Handley made many trips to Winchester and grew to love the town and the friends that he made here.

On his death in 1895, Handley bequeathed $250,000 dollars to the city of Winchester. The money was invested and when the estate grew to the value of $500,000 dollars it was to be used to build a library for the people of Winchester.

Handley Library, built in 1913.
Handley Library, built in 1913.

Handley stipulated that the remainder of the estate be used to build schools for the education of the poor. In 1922 construction began on John Handley High School, using funds from Handley’s estate.

John Handley High School
John Handley High School

Handley’s love of Winchester was so great that he purchased a burial plot in Winchester’s Mount Hebron Cemetery. He wanted his final resting place to be as close as possible to the many soldiers who lost their lives in and around this area during the Civil War.

Every year, in honour of Handley’s bequest to Winchester and his particular interest in the education of the city’s children, a parade is held from the centre of old town Winchester to Handley’s grave in Mount Hebron Cemetery. Children from the six schools that make up the Winchester Public School district, are selected to take part in the march. Dressed in their very best clothes, carrying flowers to lay at the memorial, the children parade solemnly through the town to Handley’s grave, where they listen to various school officials pay tribute to the man who helped make their education possible.

This year a little Kiwi joined the parade…

Edie all ready to join the Handley March. Olive somewhat miffed that she wasn't chosen!
Edie all ready to join the Handley March. Olive somewhat miffed that she wasn’t chosen!
One of Edie's great friends was on the march too...made it even more exciting.
One of Edie’s great friends was on the march too…made it even more exciting.
Due to my new role as a working person, Richard joined the parade and acted as official papparazo...
Edie loved having her Dad walk alongside her and take plenty of pics for Mum!
I think Judge Handley would have smiled as he watched this lot marching...
I think Judge Handley would have smiled as he watched this lot marching…
Edie's floral tribute.
Edie’s floral tribute.
Mount Hebron Cemetery.
Mount Hebron Cemetery.
Final resting place of Winchester's number one fan :)
Final resting place of Winchester’s number one fan 🙂
Our very solemn and respectful Edie!
Our very solemn and respectful Edie!

If you were hoping to read all about our trip to Puerto Rico…apologies…am still sifting through photos but promise to share something soon. It’s Apple Blossom this weekend and the town is already abuzz. We have decided to take advantage of the long weekend and head away. We are going to Pennsylvania to visit two very iconic but very different American attractions – Hershey World and Gettysburg. That might need two separate blog posts!!

Take care everyone. Hope you are all well xxx

 

 

 

 

Middleburg

When driving to Winchester from Dulles airport there are a couple of options – the faster but not very scenic drive on Route 7 or the slower but much nicer drive along Route 50. On my very first trip to Winchester, Richard took the Route 50 option – a drive which takes you through beautiful countryside, past stately homes, and through quaint villages such as Middleburg.

Middleburg was established in 1787 and now boasts an official population of about 700 people. It lies in the middle of what could best be described as ‘horse country’ and has in times past been referred to as the nation’s horse and hunt capital. If you are into foxhunting and steeplechasing, then Middleburg is your town. One famous couple by the names of John and Jacqueline Kennedy rented a Middleburg property as their country retreat during JFK’s presidency. Apparently it was the house at Middleburg that Jacquie considered home – not the White House.

Mrs Kennedy shows the King of Pakistan her horse.
Mrs Kennedy shows the King of Pakistan her horse.

You’ve probably gathered by now that Middleburg is historic, beautiful and charming, and as we drove through the village on our way to Winchester I said to Richard, “I think I’ll be okay if it’s like this”. He looked me in the eye and slowly said these words, “Chrissy…Winchester is not like this!”

Fortunately Middleburg is only a short drive east and over the year we’ve been in Winchester we’ve made a few trips there. Just before Christmas last year we had dinner in Middleburg’s oldest building, The Red Fox Inn, and today we ventured back for Middleburg’s annual Christmas celebration. We were keen to watch the Middleburg Hunt Club parading down the main street. (In America fox hunting is often referred to as fox chasing as most hunts do not actually kill the fox, leaving it alone once it has gone to ground or taken refuge in a hole.)

Ready to see some horses and hounds in action.
Ready to see some horses and hounds in action.
Lots of houses all dressed up for Christmas.
Lots of houses all dressed up for Christmas.
Quick stop here for doughnuts and hot chocolate.
Quick stop here for doughnuts and hot chocolate.
Best seat in the house!
Best seat in the house!

Just after 11:00am the first of the riders appeared, and with them the gang of foxhounds. Considering the streets were lined with lots of people and many dogs of all shapes and sizes, we were impressed at how focused and calm both dogs and horses were.

Not quite the hounds of the Baskervilles!
Not quite the hounds of the Baskervilles!
All the horses were immaculately groomed and their riders scrubbed up pretty well too.
All the horses were immaculately groomed and their riders scrubbed up pretty well too.
Some of the ladies even rode side saddle - complete with appropriate riding habit.
Some of the ladies even rode side saddle – complete with appropriate riding habit.
The girls were very impressed to see this young rider in the parade.
The girls were very impressed to see this young rider in the parade.
Man wielding a whip...he must be the boss!
Man wielding a whip…he must be the boss!

As I mentioned above there were dogs everywhere – all dressed up in their Christmas best. Bows, bells, wreaths, ribbons, cardigans and coats adorned just about every dog we encountered. The buildings and sidewalks too were all done up in festive attire.

"I had to wear this stupid Father Christmas Coat ruff!".
“I had to wear this stupid Father Christmas Coat ruff!”.
You could even catch a ride with these two.
You could even catch a ride with these two.
The Red Fox Inn
The Red Fox Inn
Father Christmas was there too - I'm trying to take a photo of strangers without looking like that's what I'm doing!!
Father Christmas was there too – I’m trying to take a photo of strangers without looking like that’s what I’m doing!!
One of the sidewalk decorations, made by the local Montessori school. Loving those Montessori tower decorations.
One of the sidewalk decorations, made by the local Montessori school. Loving those Montessori tower decorations.
Edie got to have a CHIPs moment.
Edie got to have a CHIPs moment.
Whilst Olive got friendly with Frosty the Snowman.
Whilst Olive got friendly with Frosty the Snowman.
He was very happy to meet her!
He was very happy to meet her!
Time for home.
Time for home.

As I type this I’m sipping on my coffee and watching the snow come down. I’m very glad that the girls got some snow before we head for warmer climes on Friday. They didn’t even stop for breakfast – snow pants, coats, hats, gloves, scarfs on and out they went. Their boogie boards are doubling as great sleds!

This will likely be my last post before we leave on Friday. I’ll have my laptop with me so look out for a post from Aotearoa – that’s kiwi speak for New Zealand 🙂

We arrive in Hawkes Bay on Sunday the 15th and then the girls and I are heading to Wellington on the 17th for a couple of days. We are making a very quick trip to see Richard’s mother in Australia from the 20th to the 22nd, and then we will be in Hawkes Bay until we leave on the 31st.

Take care everyone. So excited to know we will be seeing many of you very soon xxx

National Museum of the American Indian

We were invited into DC to have dinner with friends on Saturday night and decided to stay over and take the chance to visit another of the district’s myriad of museums. Olive has been studying Native American peoples at school and so we decided to make a trip to the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian. Opened in 2004, this striking building is the first national museum to focus exclusively on Native Americans from Northern, Central and Southern America.

The National Museum of the America Indian.
The National Museum of the American Indian.
There's always fun to be had wandering amongst the museums which line the National Mall.
There’s always fun to be had wandering amongst the museums which line the National Mall.
Winter gear is a must at the moment!
Winter gear is a must at the moment!
We knew we were in the right place when we spied this chap...
We knew we were in the right place when we spied this chap…

The opening of the museum has not been without controversy, with many criticisms aimed at the lack of ‘scholarship’ in evidence and too much focus on the present day. We all found it really interesting. The building itself was stunning; the exhibitions were varied and informative; and there was a great hands on area for kids. What struck me was the huge diversity that exists in this group of peoples that often get lumped together under the term ‘Native American’.

One of the current exhibitions features dolls dressed for 'The Grand Procession'.
One of the current exhibitions features dolls dressed for ‘The Grand Procession’.
All incredibly detailed and richly colored.
All incredibly detailed and richly colored.

In the activity center the girls tried their hands at balancing in a kayak, testing snowshoes, exploring different types of housing and listened to a presentation on weaving.

Testing our knowledge at the quiz station. Olive, no surprises, was the winner.
Testing our knowledge at the quiz station. Olive, no surprises, was the winner.
Trying out the kayak.
Trying out the kayak.
Tipi girl.
Tipi girl.
Finding out which plants produced good dyes.
Finding out which plants produced good dyes.

I have to admit to being guilty of thinking only of North American Indians when hearing the term Native Americans, but there was so much to learn about the people of Central and South America too.

There was a brilliant display of Aztec, Myan and Quecha artifacts.
There was a brilliant display of Aztec, Myan and Quecha artifacts.
Lots of gold on display.
Lots of gold on display.
Artifacts related to Dia de Muertos or the day of the dead.
Artifacts related to Dia de Muertos or the day of the dead.
Ceramics from Central America was the focus of one of the exhibitions.
Ceramics from Central America was the focus of one of the exhibitions.
So much to see and learn from.
So much to see and learn from.

After eating at an Ethiopian restaurant on Saturday night and then spending Sunday immersed in the indigenous cultures of America, we were feeling very multicultural, and so lucky to have these amazing opportunities. We had such a great weekend that we’re thinking of squeezing in another trip to DC this weekend. We’re hoping to pay a visit to Christmas in Middleburg which is held in a gorgeous village not too far from Winchester, and then continue on into DC for the annual boat parade in Alexandria. With all that is going on at the moment we may be trying to do too much (!) but our adventures this weekend hammered home just how much there is to experience here.

Tomorrow is a very exciting day for the girls. They will be singing on a float in the Winchester Christmas parade dressed as characters from Charlie Brown. I will be sure to see you back here with a report!

Lots more pictures from our weekend if you click on the link to my Flickr photos. Take care everyone – 12 more sleeps!!

I love you…a bushel and a peck…

We had grand plans on Saturday to head into DC and attend the Library of Congress National Book Festival. It sounded wonderful – loads of great author talks, books signings, heaps for the kids – but by Friday afternoon we were all exhausted and Richard had to fly to Belgium late Saturday so I made an executive decision to skip it. We should have at least two more chances to experience the festival before we leave the US, so we opted for a quieter day at home which we hoped would culminate in victory on the water in San Francisco! Ha – those plans were foiled.

Instead we made a visit to one of our local markets – Marker-Miller Orchards – to do a wee bit of apple picking.

IMG_8947

At Marker-Miller you can pick your own fruit, take a wagon ride and sit on a rocking chair on the porch whilst the kids run around in the play area. It’s always busy and a quick glance at the licence plates in the car park tell you that people come from many other states to load up on fresh fruit and vegetables, and the baked goods, cider and preserves you can buy in the shop. It reminds me a lot of living in Hastings and going with Mum to get our produce from one of the numerous orchards not far from where we lived.

Play time!
Play time!
The much coveted rocking chairs on the porch. People hover behind them waiting to pounce when one is vacant.
The much coveted rocking chairs on the porch. People hover behind them waiting to pounce when one is vacant.
Practising for my old age :)
Practising for my old age 🙂

Picking apples in the US requires the use of technical vocabulary – specifically the words bushel and peck. Bushels and pecks are measures of volume, with a peck being equivalent to 2 gallons and a bushel being equivalent to 4 pecks or 8 gallons. So if you ever wondered just what the “peck” Peter Piper was picking, now you know!

Peter Piper and his peck!
Peter Piper and his peck!
Richard making the big decision - peck sized bag or bushel sized?
Richard making the big decision – peck sized bag or bushel sized?
Olive Piper picking her peck!
Olive Piper picking her peck!
Edie Piper eating hers!
Edie Piper eating hers!

When the girls were very little we used to visit the library at least once a week and we’d always come home with kids music CDs. Our library had a great selection and the wonderful Dan Zanes was one of our favourites. We loved to sing along to his rendition of a song called Bushel and a Peck – we had no idea what those two words meant but we loved belting it out – especially the “doodle oodle oodle” bit!

Bushel and a Peck was written in the early 1950’s and was introduced in the musical Guys and Dolls. Here’s the hugely popular Doris Day version…

Right I’m off to do something with a bushel load of apples! They may be hurled at the television later this afternoon!!

Take care everyone. Missing you all and sending lots of love xxx