All at sea in St Michaels

After the war of 1812, shipbuilding declined in St Michaels, but a few decades later the town was revived by the oyster industry. By the late nineteenth century most households in St Michaels had at least one occupant engaged in oystering – tonging oysters from the nearby Miles River or working in the shucking houses that came to line the waterfront. One of these businesses came to specialise in crabmeat and devised a five level grading system for crab that is still used today.

Oyster shells on the ground in St Michaels.
Oyster shells on the ground in St Michaels.
Edie at work in the crabmeat factory.
Edie at work in the crabmeat factory.

We spent Saturday immersed in the history of St Michaels boat building and seafood industries. St Michaels is home to the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, a wonderful collection of outdoor and indoor exhibits – which include a working boatyard – that really brings to life the importance both economic and social, of Chesapeake Bay.

Finding coffee was the first order of business for the day and this drive through stand delivered us the best coffee we've had since moving to the US. Just as good as a kiwi latte.
Finding coffee was the first order of business for the day and this drive through stand delivered us the best coffee we’ve had since moving to the US. Just as good as a kiwi latte.
Exploring the Hooper Strait lighthouse which was originally built in 1879.
Exploring the Hooper Strait lighthouse which was originally built in 1879.
With the big lens at the top of the lighthouse.
With the big lens at the top of the lighthouse.
Modelling suitable yacht club attire.
Modelling suitable yacht club attire.
I don't think these two would get in!
I don’t think these two would get in!
Having a go at catching crabs.
Having a go at catching crabs.
Checking out some of the restoration work taking place at the museum.
Checking out some of the restoration work taking place at the museum.
So that's what a boat's bottom looks like!
So that’s what a boat’s bottom looks like!

From the Maritime Museum we headed to the wharf and boarded The Patriot – a passenger cruise boat which takes daily tours on the Miles River. For ninety minutes we cruised along the river, admiring the stunning homes which grace the waterfront and learning interesting facts about the history of the area and the wildlife that call the river home – Olive and Edie even got to have a go at steering the boat!

All ready to set sail.
All ready to set sail.
Captain Olive...
Captain Olive…
and first mate Edie.
and first mate Edie.
A pair of osprey come to this channel marker every year to nest. Ospreys are monogamous but "vacation" separately every year. The Captain surmised that perhaps this is the secret to a lasting relationship!
A pair of osprey come to this channel marker every year to nest. Ospreys are monogamous but “vacation” separately every year. The Captain surmised that perhaps this is the secret to a lasting relationship!
An example of the grand homes that line the banks of the Miles river. The owners have four other homes and used this house for a grand total of three weekends last year!
An example of the grand homes that line the banks of the Miles river. The owners of this particular property have four other homes and used this house for a grand total of three weekends last year!

As we were coming to the end of our cruise we were treated to the most amazing sight – the Captain ordered everyone up on top of the boat with their cameras as he had spotted a deer swimming across the river. Apparently he spots deer in the river only a couple of times a year, and as this was the Patriot’s first voyage of the season he was a teeny bit excited! It would never have occurred to me that a deer would swim and the sight of the doe powering through the water was nothing short of amazing.

Bambi Phelps in action :)
Bambi Phelps in action 🙂

There are loads more pics of our trip to St Michaels if you click on the link to my Flickr photos.

As I type this we are coming to the end of Easter Sunday. It’s been a very relaxed day – the Easter Bunny hid some treats for the girls to find and we spent the morning exploring the nearby townships of Easton and Tilghman Island.

Tomorrow we are headed back home after a very relaxing getaway. This area has completely won us over and we would very much like to make a return visit.

Hope you have all had safe, happy and chocolate filled Easters. Missing you all and sending all our love xxx

2 Replies to “All at sea in St Michaels”

  1. Your Easter weekend looks fabulous and the accomodation is in a perfect spot. No wonder you had a relaxing time.We had a lazy few days here with the family.
    Cheers
    Karen

  2. Olive and Edie will certainly have loads of adventures to tell their own children when they grow up. You really know how to have fun!

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